Visit us on the web

Visitor Statistics

JoomlaWatch Stats 1.2.7 by Matej Koval

Countries

47.9%UNITED KINGDOM UNITED KINGDOM
21.6%ISRAEL ISRAEL
12.2%UNITED STATES UNITED STATES
4.1%AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIA
3.1%IRELAND IRELAND
2.3%CANADA CANADA
1.4%GERMANY GERMANY
0.6%NETHERLANDS NETHERLANDS
0.3%FRANCE FRANCE
0.3%JAPAN JAPAN
0.3%CHINA CHINA
0.2%BELGIUM BELGIUM
0.2%SPAIN SPAIN
0.2%SWEDEN SWEDEN
0.2%NEW ZEALAND NEW ZEALAND
0.2%MALTA MALTA
0.2%TAIWAN TAIWAN
0.2%NORWAY NORWAY
0.2%DENMARK DENMARK
0.2%GREECE GREECE

Visitors

Today: 4
Yesterday: 7
This week: 37
Last week: 42
This month: 92
Last month: 256
Total: 3570


2009

Project Birdwatch

a 501c 3 not-for-profit all-volunteer organization    

Who We Are

Passionate bird lovers who understand the enormous responsibility of maintaining the natural Indonesian homelands of some of our planet’s most magnificent feathered creatures.

Loving caregivers who understand the responsibility of maintaining the dignity, enriching the lives, and encouraging the natural behaviors of companion parrots who share our homes.

Read more...
 
Returning Wild Parrots to their Forest Homes

T he Need for a Multi-Facetted Approach to Cockatoo Conservation in Indonesia

Part One: Returning Wild Parrots to their Forest Homes by Stewart Metz, M.D. Director, The Indonesian Parrot Project, and Konservasi Kakatua Indonesia

Returning Wild Parrots to their Natural Homes in the Forest

As we are all aware, the root causes of parrot smuggling in Indonesia are both complex and multiple. They include severe poverty (which unfortunately is worst in the Eastern part of Indonesia—where the parrots are found); government ignorance and corruption; the deep fascination with caged birds as status-symbols; and above all, the virtual absence of understanding of the basic nature of parrots and their needs, especially in captivity. Therefore it only makes sense that a multi-facetted program is required to attempt to stop, or even reduce, this inhumane practice. Some of that work will be required in the field (in situ conservation), some involves confiscated parrots who—regrettably—relegated to captivity (ex situ conservation), at least for a while; others involve the parrots only indirectly, for example by fostering attitudinal changes in the local people through , for example, bird-watching expeditions.

Read more...
 

Saving the World's Rarest Cockatoo

 Yellow-crested Abbott’s cockatoo at nest site

October 1, 2008  (San Francisco, CA)   The world’s rarest cockatoo has been re-discovered in Indonesia.  The Yellow-crested Abbott’s Cockatoo is found in the wild only on a single island (tiny Masakambing Island; 500 ha) in the Masalembu Archipelago. This island is in the remote Java Sea, north of the cities of Surabaya and Bali, and east of southern Sumatra.  This archipelago also contains Masalembu Island [2000 ha] and Keramaian Island [300 ha].

Read more...
 

Thank you letter from the Indonesian Parrot Project

We have received the following thank you letter from Stewart A. Metz MD from the Indonesian Parrot Project:

Read more...
 

THE SCA’S CHOSEN CONSERVATION PROJECT FOR 2009

 THE MISSION OF THE INDONESIAN PARROT PROJECT

A Multi-Factorial Approach towards the Preservation of Indonesia’s Endangered Parrots

Each year The SCA chooses a conservation project to undertake or support.  The project we have chosen to support this year is The Indonesian Parrot Project; here is a report on the project and it's aims and achievements.  There will be follow up reports on the project's progress throughout the year.

Read more...
 


Copyright 2009 The Society for Conservation in Aviculture. All Rights Reserved.
Registered Charity Number 1082619
Designed and Hosted by Paul Warburton