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Conservation Projects
Cape Parrot 12th Annual Count
The 12th annual count report is now available for you to download in the documents section.  Click HERE to download it.
 

Project Birdwatch

a 501c 3 not-for-profit all-volunteer organization    

Who We Are

Passionate bird lovers who understand the enormous responsibility of maintaining the natural Indonesian homelands of some of our planet’s most magnificent feathered creatures.

Loving caregivers who understand the responsibility of maintaining the dignity, enriching the lives, and encouraging the natural behaviors of companion parrots who share our homes.

Read more...
 
Returning Wild Parrots to their Forest Homes

T he Need for a Multi-Facetted Approach to Cockatoo Conservation in Indonesia

Part One: Returning Wild Parrots to their Forest Homes by Stewart Metz, M.D. Director, The Indonesian Parrot Project, and Konservasi Kakatua Indonesia

Returning Wild Parrots to their Natural Homes in the Forest

As we are all aware, the root causes of parrot smuggling in Indonesia are both complex and multiple. They include severe poverty (which unfortunately is worst in the Eastern part of Indonesia—where the parrots are found); government ignorance and corruption; the deep fascination with caged birds as status-symbols; and above all, the virtual absence of understanding of the basic nature of parrots and their needs, especially in captivity. Therefore it only makes sense that a multi-facetted program is required to attempt to stop, or even reduce, this inhumane practice. Some of that work will be required in the field (in situ conservation), some involves confiscated parrots who—regrettably—relegated to captivity (ex situ conservation), at least for a while; others involve the parrots only indirectly, for example by fostering attitudinal changes in the local people through , for example, bird-watching expeditions.

Read more...
 

Saving the endangered Gouldian finch

Gouldian finch research project
Dr Sarah Pryke
November 2008

The Australian Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae) is arguably one of the most brilliantly coloured birds in the world, and is also one of the most popular domesticated pet birds, bred by aviculturists throughout the USA, Europe, and Asia.

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Cape Parrot Project

CAPE PARROT PROJECT

DETAILS FOR THE SOCIETY FOR CONSERVATION IN AVICULTURE

Project Co-ordinator: Prof Colleen T. Downs
School of Biological & Conservation Sciences
P/Bag X01
Scottsville
3209

Read more...
 


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